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Your searched on: pregnancy and childbirth

Pregnancy and Childbirth
Provides links to info on pregnancy, labor and delivery, and the postpartum period. Offers interactive tool to calculate your due date. Also links to interactive tool that shows how an embryo grows into a baby.

Childbirth Classes
You and your partner can learn a lot by taking a childbirth education class. This is especially true if it's your first pregnancy. A good time to start the class is in your sixth or seventh month. If a friend is going to be your labor support (labor...

Childbirth: Epidurals
An epidural for childbirth, called an "epidural" for short, is a tiny tube that puts pain medicine directly into the area in your back around your spinal cord. This area is called the epidural space. An epidural can be used during childbirth to partly or fully numb the lower body. The amount of medicine you get will...

Childbirth: Pudendal Block
To relieve pain during the second (pushing) stage of labor, an injection called a pudendal block can be given through the vaginal wall and into the pudendal nerve in the pelvis. This numbs the area between the vagina and anus. It doesn't relieve the pain of contractions. A pudendal block works fast, is easily given, and...

Childbirth Afterpains
Afterpains are sharp pains in the belly that occur in the first few days after childbirth. They may cause some discomfort. But afterpains help reduce uterine bleeding. They also help shrink the uterus back to the size it was before you were pregnant. You are most likely to notice these pains when you breastfeed...

Spinal Block for Childbirth
Spinal anesthesia (spinal block) is a way to control pain using anesthetic medicine. It causes complete loss of feeling and muscle control below the waist. A spinal block is often used for an assisted delivery (such as a cesarean section or a delivery with forceps). Or it can be used when a delivery is happening fast...

After Childbirth: Pelvic Bone Problems
Separated pubic symphysis The left and right bones of your pelvic girdle are joined at the front by a narrow section of cartilage and ligament. This is called the pubic symphysis, or symphysis pubis. As the pelvic bones loosen during pregnancy, the pubic symphysis can temporarily separate. This is not a dangerous...

Pregnancy: Should I Have an Epidural During Childbirth?
Guides you through decision to have an epidural during childbirth. Lists benefits and risks. Lists other ways to control labor pain. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Childbirth: Perineal Massage Before Labor
In women, the perineum is the muscle and tissue between the anus and the vulva. During childbirth, the perineum stretches and sometimes tears. One way to help prevent tearing is to stretch and massage the perineum for a few weeks before your due date. Studies show that women who did regular perineal massage reported...

Molar Pregnancy
What is a molar pregnancy? A molar pregnancy means that tissue that normally becomes a fetus instead becomes an abnormal growth in your uterus. Even though it isn't an embryo, this growth triggers symptoms of pregnancy. This tissue can cause serious problems in some cases. So a molar pregnancy should be treated right...

Childbirth: Laboring in Water and Water Delivery
Laboring in water Some hospitals and birthing centers offer tubs or whirlpools for labor. If yours does, talk to your doctor or midwife about laboring in water. The warm water supports your body. It also helps you to relax. For many women, laboring in water has been proved to: Reduce labor pain. Reduce the use of or...

Sex After Childbirth
For a while after childbirth, don't be surprised if you have little interest in sex. Physical recovery, exhaustion, and hormonal changes often affect sexuality after childbirth. Each woman's experience is different. Together, you and your partner can connect emotionally and physically by knowing ahead of time what...

Breathing Techniques for Childbirth
As your due date draws nearer, learn and practice controlled breathing techniques for pain management during childbirth. Concentrating on your breathing can help distract you from pain, relax both your muscles and your mind, and keep your oxygen supply up. If you haven't learned specific breathing techniques (such as...

Childbirth: Strep Infections During Delivery
Some women carry group B streptococcus bacteria in the vagina. And for some of them, it does not cause problems. (This type of strep is not the same as the type that causes strep throat.) But a woman who has group B strep in her vagina can pass it...

Ectopic Pregnancy
Discusses ectopic pregnancy (tubal pregnancy), a condition where a fertilized egg grows outside of the uterus. Covers tests and treatments. Discusses complications, including fallopian tube damage. Covers risk factors like smoking, PID, or tubal ligation.

Local Anesthesia for Childbirth
Local anesthesia for childbirth is most commonly given as a shot that numbs the area around the vagina just before an episiotomy is done. An episiotomy is a cut made in the tissue between the vagina and anus just before the baby's head starts to emerge. (The tissue is called the perineum.) The cut makes the vaginal...

Pregnancy: Blood Clots
Learn what blood clots are and how they can happen during and after pregnancy.

Pregnancy
Is this topic for you? This topic covers pregnancy information, including planning for labor and delivery. If you aren't pregnant yet, see the topic Preparing for a Healthy Pregnancy. For more information on labor and delivery, see the topic Labor and Delivery. What can you do to have a healthy pregnancy? You may be...

Childbirth Planning: How to Partner With Your Doctor
Pregnant women face lots of decisions about childbirth—what tests to have during pregnancy, where to give birth, how to manage pain. But sometimes those decisions are made for women without their opinions and guidance. You are more likely to have the pregnancy and childbirth experience that you want if you and your...

After Childbirth: Coping and Adjusting
You can take measures to make your life easier in the days and weeks after childbirth (postpartum period). Accept help, seek help You may be exhausted from the delivery and from being up at night with your baby. Don't expect that you'll be able to keep the house spotless and do all the household...

Doulas and Support During Childbirth
How does support help during labor and childbirth? Having support while you're in labor and delivering your baby can be a very positive experience. Your support person may be your partner, a loved one, or a friend. You may get support from hospital nurses, a midwife, or a birth coach, also known as a doula. Doulas give...

After Childbirth: Urination and Bowel Problems
You may have some difficulty urinating for a day or two after delivery. Your first bowel movement may be quite painful if you have had an incision ( episiotomy) or a tear in your vagina. You may also have constipation or discomfort with bowel movements for a few days after delivery. Drink plenty of water and juices and...

Home Pregnancy Tests
Home pregnancy tests can find the presence of a pregnancy hormone (called human chorionic gonadotropin, or hCG) in a sample of urine. High levels of hCG are made during pregnancy. The home tests have similar results to the pregnancy tests done on urine in most doctors' offices if they are used exactly as instructed...

Symptoms of Pregnancy
You may be pregnant if you: Have had sexual intercourse and you have not used any method of birth control. Have missed one or more periods. Have your period, but there is a lot less bleeding than usual. Take birth control pills, but you missed a...

Immunizations and Pregnancy
Your immunity protects both you and your fetus. After you have been immunized (vaccinated) against or infected by a virus or bacteria, your body develops an immunity to that infectious agent. Full immunity can protect you from future infection, either for a lifetime or a limited period. Partial immunity strengthens your...

Pregnancy and Diabetes: Planning for Pregnancy
Talk to your doctor if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and are planning to get pregnant. To make sure that both you and your baby stay healthy, you may need to fine-tune your diabetes care before you get pregnant. If you have diabetes and want to get pregnant, the most important thing you can do is to get your...

Preparing for a Healthy Pregnancy
Even though you're not pregnant yet, you might already be thinking about which room to turn into the baby's room and how to decorate it. And you might be making lists of all the baby clothes and supplies that you'll need. But it's also a good time to take some steps to help yourself have a happy pregnancy and a healthy...

Cholestasis of Pregnancy
Learn about cholestasis of pregnancy, a liver problem that can happen when you're pregnant. Includes info on symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and self-care.

Childbirth: Opioid Pain Medicines
To help control the pain and stress of labor, you may get pain medicines. The medicine can be injected into a vein or into the muscle. The most common pain medicines used are opioids. Examples include fentanyl, morphine, and nalbuphine. How opioids work for labor pain Opioids suppress how you perceive pain, and they...

Multiple Sclerosis and Pregnancy
Most people who are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) are women in their child-bearing years. Questions about whether MS affects getting pregnant or about labor and delivery are common. Here are some answers: Most couples in which one partner has MS are able to have children without MS affecting the...

Schizophrenia and Pregnancy
People with schizophrenia have goals and desires just like people who do not have the illness. These may include starting a family. You can have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby if you have schizophrenia. But there are some things to know. You will want people to help you during your pregnancy and when you are...

Obesity and Pregnancy
How does your weight affect your pregnancy? Most pregnant women have healthy babies—and that includes women who are obese. But being very heavy does increase the chance of problems. Babies born to mothers who are obese have a higher risk of: Birth defects, such as a heart defect or neural tube defects. Being too large...

Lupus and Pregnancy
Lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE) doesn't typically affect a woman's ability to conceive. But if you are having a lupus flare or are taking corticosteroid medicines, you may have irregular menstrual cycles, making it difficult to plan a...

Travel During Pregnancy
If you have an uncomplicated pregnancy, you are likely to be able to travel during most of your pregnancy. Just be sure to discuss air travel and extended trips with your doctor ahead of time. When traveling, it's also smart to carry a written record of your due date and any medical conditions you have...

HIV and Pregnancy
The United States Preventive Services Task Force, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Pediatrics, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend that all pregnant women be screened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This is because early detection and...

Pregnancy and Epilepsy
Most women who have epilepsy deliver healthy babies. But the risk of birth defects, stillbirth, and seizure-related problems is higher for babies born to women with epilepsy. Most antiepileptic medicines increase the risk even more. If you have...

Pregnancy-Related Problems
Discusses symptoms that may show a serious problem during pregnancy. Covers vaginal bleeding, fever, or swelling. Describes emergency symptoms like shock, seizures, or leaks from your vagina. Offers tool to check symptoms and info on when to call doctor.

Medicines During Pregnancy
Doctors usually tell women to avoid medicines during pregnancy, if possible, especially during the first 3 months. That is when a baby's organs form. But sometimes you have to take medicine to treat a health problem, such as high blood pressure or asthma. So first your doctor or midwife will look at the risk. Is the...

Anemia During Pregnancy
Anemia during a healthy pregnancy is common. Anemia means your red blood cell level is low. It can happen when you're pregnant because your body is working hard to make more blood to help your baby grow. Sometimes anemia during pregnancy can be...

Post-Term Pregnancy
Most babies are born at 37 to 42 weeks of pregnancy. (Those weeks are counted from the first day of your last menstrual period.) A pregnancy that has reached 42 or more weeks is called a "post-term" or "post-date" pregnancy. You might also call it...

Pregnancy: Hemorrhoids and Constipation
Hemorrhoids are swollen veins at the end of the large intestine (anus). They often stick out from the anus (external hemorrhoids). They can also be located on the inside of the lower intestine (internal hemorrhoids). Bleeding, itching, and pain are...

Sex During Pregnancy
Vaginal intercourse can be continued as usual if your pregnancy is uncomplicated. Discuss any concerns or questions with your doctor. Sex during the first trimester will not cause any problems, such as a miscarriage. The fetus will not be harmed...

Exercise During Pregnancy
Exercise is good for healthy pregnant women who are receiving prenatal care. Try to do at least 2½ hours a week of moderate exercise. One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week. It's fine to be active in blocks of 10 minutes or more throughout your day and week. Exercise can improve your...

Pregnancy: Relationship Changes
Pregnancy starts a new phase of your relationship with your partner. You can expect a natural shift in roles as well as attention to and expectations of each other. If you are new to parenthood as a couple, you will notice that your focus on each other is evolving into something new—attention to a third party, your...

Caffeine During Pregnancy
Many women have caffeine during pregnancy. And in small amounts, caffeine is safe for the baby. It's a good idea to keep your caffeine intake below 200 mg a day, because: More caffeine may be connected to a higher rate of miscarriage....

Toxoplasmosis During Pregnancy
Discusses risks to the fetus of a woman who gets toxoplasmosis during pregnancy. Covers common symptoms like swollen glands. Discusses treatment with antibiotics. Covers how to avoid toxoplasmosis, including avoiding raw meat and contact with cat feces.

Fatigue During Pregnancy
Most women struggle with feeling very tired when they are pregnant. This tiredness, or fatigue, is most common during the first and third trimesters. During the first trimester, the fetus is growing quickly. Your body is producing higher levels of progesterone. This hormone has been linked to increased tiredness. If...

Pregnancy: Vegetarian Diet
A balanced vegetarian diet can provide all the nutrients you need for a healthy pregnancy. If you eat a vegetarian diet, pay special attention to getting enough protein, vitamin B12, calcium, vitamin D, zinc, and iron while you are pregnant and breastfeeding. These nutrients are vital to your fetus's cellular growth...

Pregnancy: Hair Changes
During pregnancy, hormonal changes can affect how your hair looks and feels. Hair loss slows down considerably, and hair growth can increase. You may notice that your head of hair is thicker and healthier-looking than usual. But some women find that their hair is more limp and lifeless during pregnancy. It is normal...

Swelling During Pregnancy
Some mild swelling during pregnancy may occur because of normal fluid buildup. Swelling is most likely to be noticeable in your face, hands, or feet. As your pregnancy progresses, your uterus puts pressure on the circulation to your legs and may cause swelling in your feet and ankles. Normally, foot swelling gets worse...

Pregnancy: Varicose Veins
Varicose veins are enlarged, swollen veins that are caused by faulty valves in the veins or weak vein walls. They are common during pregnancy, particularly in women with a family history of the problem. Varicose veins typically develop on the legs but can also affect the vulva. Though varicose veins are often only a...

Pregnancy: Dropping (Lightening)
At the end of the third trimester, the baby settles, or drops lower, into the mother's pelvis. This is known as dropping or lightening. Dropping is not a good predictor of when labor will begin. In first-time mothers, dropping usually occurs 2 to 4 weeks before delivery, but it can happen earlier. In women who have...

Bed Rest in Pregnancy
What is bed rest? Bed rest is limiting physical activity during your pregnancy. It can last a few weeks or even months. It may be at home or in the hospital. Your doctor may put you on partial bed rest or full bed rest. Partial bed rest usually means it's usually okay to sit, stand, or walk around for short...

Multiple Pregnancy: Should I Consider a Multifetal Pregnancy Reduction?
Guides through decision to have a multifetal pregnancy reduction. Discusses comparisons between twins after fetal reduction versus triplets (no fetal reduction). Covers benefits and risks. Includes an interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Breastfeeding During Pregnancy
You usually can continue breastfeeding your child if you become pregnant. If you breastfeed while you are pregnant, be aware of the following issues: Breastfeeding during pregnancy is not recommended if you are at risk for preterm labor....

Nutrition During Pregnancy
A balanced, nutritious diet during pregnancy is important to maintain your health and nourish your fetus. In general, pregnant women need to increase their daily caloric intake by 340 calories in the second trimester and 450 calories in the third trimester. Most women who are pregnant need 2,200 to 2,900 calories a...

Pregnancy: Kick Counts
After 18 to 20 weeks, you will notice that your baby moves and kicks more at certain times of the day. For example, when you are active, you may feel less kicking than when you are resting quietly. At your prenatal visits, your doctor may ask you whether the baby is active. Kick counts. In the last trimester of...

Pregnancy: Hand Changes
During pregnancy, changes in the hands are common. Mild swelling of your hands may be caused by the normal buildup of fluid during pregnancy. Red, itchy palms and soles of the feet are caused by changing hormone levels. The symptoms go away after delivery. Moisturizers may give some relief. An...

High-Risk Pregnancy
What is a high-risk pregnancy? Your pregnancy is called high-risk if you or your baby has an increased chance of a health problem. Many things can put you at high risk. Being called "high-risk" may sound scary. But it's just a way for doctors to make sure that you get special attention during your pregnancy. Your...

Childbirth: Is Planning a C-Section a Good Choice?
In the past 40 years, the rate of cesarean (C-section) deliveries has jumped from about 1 out of 20 births to about 1 out of 3 births. This trend has caused experts to worry that C-sections are being done more often than needed. Because of...

Cancer During Pregnancy
On rare occasions, cancer coincides with pregnancy. Because the medicines and radiation used for treating cancer can be dangerous to a fetus, a pregnant woman and her doctors must weigh a number of factors when planning her care, including: The fetus's gestational age. The type and location of the cancer...

Pregnancy: Dealing With Morning Sickness
Briefly discusses managing morning sickness. Offer tips to manage nausea and vomiting. Provides links to more extensive info on pregnancy and pregnancy-related problems.

Depression During Pregnancy
Depression is common during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. If you have symptoms of depression during pregnancy or are depressed and learn you are pregnant, make a treatment plan with your doctor right away. If you are being treated for depression and are planning a pregnancy, talk to your doctor ahead of...

Fever During Pregnancy
It is not unusual to develop a viral illness that causes a fever during pregnancy or after your delivery. Mild fevers that last only a short time usually are not a concern. An ongoing fever that does not get better with home treatment, such as taking acetaminophen, or that does not improve after several days may mean...

Asthma During Pregnancy
Covers questions about asthma during pregnancy and labor. Looks at treatment with medicines including inhaled albuterol, budesonide, salmeterol, and formoterol. Includes treatment of allergies. Covers safety of steroids for pregnant mother and baby.

Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Pregnancy
Antiphospholipid syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease that has been closely linked to some cases of recurrent miscarriage. This syndrome increases blood clotting. It can cause dangerous blood clots (thrombosis) and problems with blood flow. For some women, the only sign of this condition is an early miscarriage. Or...

Smoking: Problems With Pregnancy
If you are a woman who smokes and you are thinking about getting pregnant or are pregnant, now is a good time to quit smoking. Women who smoke may have a harder time getting pregnant. Women who smoke are more likely to have the following...

Postpartum: First 6 Weeks After Childbirth
What is postpartum? During the first weeks after giving birth, your body begins to heal and adjust to not being pregnant. This is called postpartum (or the postpartum period). Your body goes through many changes as you recover. These changes are different for every woman. The first weeks after childbirth also are a time...

Diabetes: Preparing for Pregnancy
If you are a woman with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who is planning to become pregnant, meet with your doctor. Your doctor will want to talk to you about your A1c goal, your medicine for diabetes, your weight, and getting enough folic acid. Your doctor will want to make sure that you are up to date with immunizations. And...

Pregnancy: Healthy Weight Gain
During pregnancy, lots of women wonder about how their body will change and how much weight they will gain. Maybe this is something that you've been thinking about too. Weight gain is healthy and normal when you're pregnant. And there's no fixed number of pounds that you should be aiming for. Instead, there's a range of...

Partner Support During Pregnancy
Pregnancy is usually a time of excitement. But sometimes, pregnant women and their partners may feel like they're expecting a bundle of anxiety along with the joy. They have a long list of to-dos. They have to cope with the changes and unknowns that...

Pregnancy: Nosebleeds and Bleeding Gums
Some women get nosebleeds when they are pregnant. That's because there is more blood flow to the tissue inside the nose (mucous membranes) when you are pregnant. Avoid using nonprescription nasal decongestants, such as allergy pills or sprays. If...

Pregnancy: Work and School Issues
Many women work or go to school (or both) while they are pregnant. It can keep you active and engaged. If the things you do at work or school mostly involve sitting, and if there are no other problems with your pregnancy, you can probably keep doing...

Quick Tips: Healthy Pregnancy Habits
The following are ways you can take care of your own and your baby's health during pregnancy. Visit your doctor or midwife as soon as you suspect you are pregnant. Keep regular appointments for prenatal checkups and care. Get treatment for all...

Pregnancy: Choosing a Health Professional
It's important to find a doctor or midwife who can work closely with you and share in decision making. This partnership is key to getting the care that is best for you. And it will help you have the pregnancy and childbirth that you want. Options for your care Several types of health professionals are trained to...

Pregnancy: Hot Tub and Sauna Use
Raising your core body temperature is called hyperthermia. It can harm your developing baby (fetus). It's most harmful during the early weeks when the organs are forming. Experts don't forbid hot tub or sauna use. But they do advise caution. Hyperthermia during the first weeks of pregnancy has been linked to neural...

Sleep Problems During Pregnancy
Sleep problems are common during pregnancy. Sleep studies tell us that hormonal changes, plus the discomforts of later pregnancy, can break up a pregnant woman's sleep cycle. The first trimester can bring insomnia and night waking. Most women feel the need to take naps to battle daytime sleepiness and fatigue. The...

Pregnancy: Pelvic and Hip Pain
When you are pregnant, you may get aches and pains in your hips and pelvic area. This is a normal sign that your pelvic area is preparing for childbirth. (This area is also called the pelvic girdle.) Pregnancy hormones are relaxing your ligaments. This loosens up your pelvic bones so they can shift and open for...

Breast Changes During Pregnancy
As the rest of your body changes during pregnancy, your breasts change too, getting themselves ready to make and supply milk for your baby. Your breasts will get bigger. They may be sore sometimes. Your nipples may change color. It's all a natural part of being pregnant. And if some of these changes bother you, it's...

Pregnancy: First Prenatal Visit
Your first prenatal visit is likely to be more extensive than later prenatal checks. Your doctor will take your medical history and do a complete physical exam. Your medical history helps your doctor plan the best possible care for your pregnancy...

Leg Cramps During Pregnancy
Leg cramps affect almost half of all pregnant women. The cause of leg cramps during pregnancy is not fully known, but they may be caused by reduced levels of calcium or increased levels of phosphorus in the blood. Leg cramps are more...

Pregnancy: Vaginal Discharge and Leaking Fluid
Abnormal vaginal discharge Changing hormone levels during pregnancy can affect the normal balance of organisms in the vagina. If you are pregnant and have abnormal vaginal symptoms, such as vaginal discharge or itching, talk with your doctor about your symptoms before using home treatment measures or nonprescription...

Passing Tissue During Pregnancy
It may be hard to tell if you have passed tissue, because when you pass tissue you may also pass large blood clots. Tissue may appear gray or pink. Passing tissue may be a sign of miscarriage. If you pass tissue or have moderate bleeding any time during pregnancy, call your doctor immediately. If possible, collect the...

Massage Therapy During Pregnancy
Massage is rubbing the soft tissues of the body, including the skin and muscles. Massage therapists usually apply pressure with their hands, but they can also use their forearms, elbows, or feet. Some people believe that massage works because the touch is healing. Touch also communicates a sense of caring. When you...

Emotional Changes During Pregnancy
Pregnancy prompts your body to make lots of hormones. These hormones can affect your mind and your body. It's common to feel tired, forgetful, or moody. And you also may be focused on other things, like body changes, symptoms, money worries, and all the ways your life is about to change. It is common to go through...

Pregnancy: Deciding Where to Deliver
When it's time to give birth, you have a choice of where to deliver your baby. Do you want to have your baby in a hospital? Is a birthing center more your style? Or would you prefer to have your baby at home? Do you plan to use a midwife? What will...

Your Baby's Movements During Pregnancy
At some point in your pregnancy, you will feel your baby move. For example, your baby may kick, hiccup, roll, turn, or twist. These movements are common and expected. As your baby grows, these movements will get stronger. But sometimes you might feel a movement that surprises you. You may wonder what it means. Most...

Pregnancy After Bariatric Surgery
What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery (such as gastric bypass or banding) helps people lose weight. It's only used for people who are obese and have not been able to lose weight with diet and exercise. This surgery makes the stomach smaller. Some types of surgery also change how your stomach connects with...

Vaginal Yeast Infection During Pregnancy
If you are pregnant and have vaginal infection symptoms, see your doctor. Do not use nonprescription yeast infection medicine unless you discuss it with your doctor first. Experts recommend that during pregnancy: Vaginal medicines should be used for yeast infection treatment. These may be vaginal creams or...

Pregnancy: Chemicals, Cosmetics, and Radiation
Chemical exposure Take care to protect your developing fetus from dangerous substances during your pregnancy: Fumes from pesticides, household cleaners, and paint can be harmful to a developing fetus, especially in the first trimester. While you are pregnant, use chemical-free cleaning alternatives. If you...

Pregnancy: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Tingling, numbness, and pain in the hands are common during pregnancy, especially in the last trimester. These problems are usually caused by carpal tunnel syndrome, and they usually go away after pregnancy. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a specific group of symptoms that can include tingling, numbness, weakness, or pain...

Nausea or Vomiting During Pregnancy
Many women have problems with nausea and sometimes vomiting ( morning sickness) during the first 16 weeks of pregnancy. For some women, morning sickness may be one of the first signs of pregnancy. The term "morning sickness" can be misleading, because symptoms can occur at any time of the day. The causes of morning...

Multiple Pregnancy: Twins or More
Discusses pregnancy of two or more babies. Covers identical and fraternal twins and triplets. Discusses infertility treatment, a common cause of multiple pregnancy. Discusses common tests, possible complications, and treatment options. Covers self-care.

Vaginal Bleeding During Pregnancy
The following guidelines will help you determine the severity of your vaginal bleeding. Severe bleeding means you are soaking through your usual pads or tampons each hour for 2 or more hours. For most women, soaking through their usual pads or tampons every hour for 2 or more hours is not normal and is considered...

Pregnancy After Age 35
Most women who are older than 35 have healthy pregnancies. But as you age beyond your mid-30s, some risks do increase. If you are an older mother-to-be, you can increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy. See your doctor for a checkup before you become pregnant. Keep a regular schedule of prenatal checkups when...

Rh Sensitization During Pregnancy
What is Rh sensitization during pregnancy? If you are Rh-negative, your red blood cells do not have a marker called Rh factor on them. Rh-positive blood does have this marker. If your blood mixes with Rh-positive blood, your immune system will react to the Rh factor by making antibodies to destroy it. This immune system...

Pregnancy: Prenatal Visit Schedule
As your pregnancy moves along, your prenatal visits will happen more often. So you'll have the chance to get to know your doctor or midwife well. It's common to see your doctor or midwife: Every 4 weeks until week 28. Every 2 to 3 weeks from weeks 28 to 36. Every week from week 36 to birth. In some cases, age or a...

Pregnancy: Should I Have Amniocentesis?
Guides you through the decision to have an amniocentesis test. Explains what amniocentesis is and how it is done. Discusses birth defects. Looks at the risks and benefits of amniocentesis. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Food Poisoning During Pregnancy
A balanced, nutritious diet during your pregnancy is important to maintain your health and nourish your fetus. When making your food choices, you generally are able to eat the foods you usually eat. But because some types of food poisoning pose a greater risk to you and your fetus, you should take a few extra...

Dental Care During Pregnancy
It's important to take care of your body when you are pregnant. This includes your teeth and gums. A healthy mouth and good dental habits are an important part of a healthy pregnancy. Regular brushing and flossing can help keep your teeth and gums...